2d Animation Principles

2d Animation Principles and tutorials with sample works

SOLID DRAWING: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008

SOLID DRAWING: 2D Animation principle The basic principles of drawing form, weight, volume solidity and the illusion of three dimensions apply to animation as it does to academic drawing. The way you draw cartoons, you draw in the classical sense, using pencil sketches and drawings for reproduction of life. You transform these into color and…

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APPEAL: 2D Animation Principle

17 December, 2008

APPEAL: 2D Animation Principle The word appeal is often misrepresented to suggest cuddly bunnies and soft kittens. It doesn’t; it means anything that a person likes to see a quality of charm, pleasing design, simplicity, communication, or magnetism. Your eye is drawn to the figure or object that has appeal, and, once them, it is…

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SECONDARY ACTION: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008

SECONDARY ACTION: 2D Animation principle A secondary action is an action that results directly from another action. Secondary actions are important in heightening interest and adding a realistic complexity to the animation. A secondary actions is always kept subordinate to the primary action if it conflicts, becomes more interesting, or dominates in any way, it…

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STRAIGHT AHEAD AND POSE-TO-POSE ACTION: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008

STRAIGHT AHEAD AND POSE-TO-POSE ACTION: 2D Animation principle There are two main approaches to hand drawn animation. The first is known as straight ahead action because the animator literally works straight ahead from his first drawing in the scene. He knows where the scene fits in the story and the business it has to include.…

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FOLLOW THROUGH & OVERLAPPING: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
FOLLOW THROUGH & OVERLAPPING: 2D Animation principle

FOLLOW THROUGH & OVERLAPPING: 2D Animation principle When you animate a character, you will notice certain things. Especially while a character moves, every thing does not start and stop at the same time. Primary action begins first, secondary action reacts to it. Primary action stops, secondary action stops after some time. So it is best…

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EXAGGERATION: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
EXAGGERATION: 2D Animation principle

EXAGGERATION: 2D Animation principle The meaning of exaggeration is in general, obvious. However, the principle of exaggeration in animation does not mean arbitrarily distorting shapes or objects or making an action more violent or unrealistic. The animator must go to the heart of anything or any idea and develop its essence, understanding the reason for…

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SLOW-IN & SLOW-OUT : 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
SLOW-IN & SLOW-OUT : 2D Animation principle

SLOW-IN & SLOW-OUT : 2D Animation principle Any action should happen in such a way that it should look believable. To attain this, timing is applied by placing inbetweens in different positions. In the case of a slow-in, most inbetweens are near the last key drawings and deceleration is very evident. In the case of…

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ANTICIPATION: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
ANTICIPATION: 2D Animation principle

ANTICIPATION: 2D Animation principle Anticipation (some times called ANTIC) is the one of the most important animation principles that plays a main role in bringing life to a character. We all know the meaning of the term Anticipation. In general we use the term to express a waiting of the next move. In animation terms…

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STRETCH AND SQUASH: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
STRETCH AND SQUASH: 2D Animation principle

STRETCH AND SQUASH: 2D Animation principle       Squash and Stretch help to define how rigid an object is. All objects change shape when a force is applied to them. Solid objects have so little that it can be ignored when you throw a bowling ball you won’t see it change form or when you…

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SPACING: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
SPACING: 2D Animation principle

SPACING: 2D Animation principle It is the allocation and placing of the inbetweens. The combination of timing and spacing determines the pace of action of any movement.   Spacing of drawing – general remarks: When any object in nature moves from a rest point X and stops at a point Y, it has a tendency,…

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TIMING: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
TIMING: 2D Animation principle

TIMING: 2D Animation principle It is the number of inbetweens between two keys. Timing is the essence of everything we do in animation. How slow or how fast an object or character moves helps define that object or character. In film animation there are 24 frames in each second (24x’s or 24fps).Full animation requires 12…

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STAGING: 2D Animation Principle

17 December, 2008

STAGING: 2D Animation Principle Staging is the presentation of an idea so it is completely and unmistakably clear. This principle translates directly from 2D hand drawn animation. An action is staged so that it is understood, a personality is staged so that it is recognizable, an expression so that it can be seen, a mood…

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ARCS: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
ARCS: 2D Animation principle

ARCS: 2D Animation principle Arcs bring life to a movement, thus avoiding a mechanical look. Arcs play an important role in bringing appeal to an action. Movements without arcs will end up in a boring pose-to-pose animation. Applying arcs also serves the purpose of applying anticipation, as the position in the middle of the arc…

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PATH OF ACTION: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
PATH OF ACTION: 2D Animation principle

PATH OF ACTION: Animation principle The path along which the action follows is called Path of Action.     Animate a ball on various paths of action: The idea is to determine the timing and spacing of inbetweens and where to opt for a Slow-in or Slow-out. Path of action clearly defines the physical forces…

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INBETWEENS: 2D Animation principle

17 December, 2008
INBETWEENS: 2D Animation principle

INBETWEENS: Animation principle The drawings that come between key drawings are called inbetweens. As the inbetweens are added the action looks more complete and appealing.   Notices that drawings numbered 2 to 16 are inserted between the key drawings 1 and 17 these are the inbetweens for this action. What Are Inbetweens?  ‘Inbetweens’ are those…

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